What are Arc-Faults and Why are They Dangerous?

By Scott Bowers,

Leviton Electrical Fire Infographic

An arc-fault is an unintentional arcing condition in a circuit. Arcing creates high intensity heating at the point of the arc, resulting in burning particles that can exceed 10,000 degrees Fahrenheit and may over time ignite surrounding material such as wood framing or insulation. 

There are two types of potentially dangerous arcs – parallel arcs and series arcs. 

Source: Leviton

What Causes Arc-Faults?

Often unseen, arc faults can occur anywhere in the home’s electrical system including:

Within Walls

  • Within walls from nails, screws or staples inadvertently driven into wires.

Within Cords

  • Within electrical cords accidently damaged by furniture resting or pressing upon them.

Within Loose Connections

  • At loose electrical connections or cords damaged by doors closing on them.

Within Damaged Cords

  • Through old or cracked wires or cords as well as wires or cords damaged by heat, sunlight or humidity. 

Prevention and Consequences of Electrical Fires

Source: Leviton

AFCI, GFCI, and AFGF Residential Breakers

By Scott Bowers,

FAQs

What’s the Difference Between BR and CH Breakers?

BR BREAKERS

  • BR breakers are 1″ in Width.
  • BR breakers are black, with black handles (In most cases. Some older styles have multicolored handles.)
  • BR breakers carry a 10 Year Warranty.

CH BREAKERS

  • CH breakers are 3/4″ in Width.
  • CH breakers are Black with Sandalwood (Tan) handles.
  • CH breakers carry a lifetime warranty.

What’s the Difference Between Type 1 and Type 2 Surge Protective Devices?

  1. Type 1 devices are installed before the main device in the loadcenter, whereas Type 2 are installed following the main devices in the loadcenters. As stated in the catalog: “Type 1 Surge Protective Device (SPD)s are intended for installation between the secondary of the service transformer and the line side of the service equipment overcurrent device, as well as the load side, including watt-hour meter socket enclosures, and are intended to be installed without an external overcurrent protective device. Type 1 devices are dual-rated for Type 2 applications as well, providing the highest ratings available for installation at the service entrance.
  2. Type 2 Surge Protective Device—Permanently connected Type 2 SPDs are intended for installation on the load side of the service equipment overcurrent device, including SPDs located at the branch panel.” the Eaton Surge website

Residential Breakers Color Matrix

Source: Eaton.com